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Memorable Reads Of The Week 5

Memorable reads of the week 5

Post Series: Memorable reads of the week

Another week has gone by in a flash. Luckily I have this series to help me get a swell summary of the more memorable articles that passed my view the last 7 days.
Let’s get into this week’s amazing reads of the week.

My memorable reads

Den Haag - Tweede Kamer Der Staten

Not abolishing dividend tax is better for the economy

Original source: Financieel Dagblad, October 15, 2018. ‘Niet afschaffen dividendtaks is beter voor economie’. Retrieved from https://fd.nl/economie-politiek/1274282/dividendbelasting-teruggeploegd-naar-bedrijven

The news of the Dutch government trying to abolish the dividend tax was news at least twice in the newspapers I read.
It’s too bad that the Dutch government decided not to go through with it as it would make Dutch dividend paying stocks at least just as interesting as Belgian once. It’s especially unfortunate for me as a Belgian investor.

Any withholding tax of a stock from another country is first subtracted from its dividend before our heavy withholding tax of 30% gets subtracted as well.
Belgium does have a double tax treaty with various countries to minimize the foreign withholding tax to 15%. This means we still have to pay a hefty 40.5% total withholding tax on any dividend coming from foreign stocks (if the country of origin has a dividend tax and it’s more than 15%).

March Against The Brexit

Marchers Clog Streets of London to Demand New Brexit Vote

Original source: S. Hui, (October 20, 2018). Marchers Clog Streets of London to Demand New Brexit Vote. Retrieved from https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-20/anti-brexit-protest-in-london-calls-for-second-referendum.

With the impending Brexit deadline of March 30th, 2019 more and more Britons are starting to realize the severe impact of leaving the EU and how it will impact their lives. Unfortunately, they are 2 and a half years later to realize this.
None of the issues that are now blocking the negotiations is anything new.
When Britain voted to leave on June 23, 2016, these future problems were clear with a quick Google search. The fact that the leave camp perpetuated blatant lies about the costs of being a member of the EU which a majority of the voters believed, just shows that a pure or direct democracy doesn’t work.

The frustrating thing is, this referendum shouldn’t have been binding. Unfortunately, if a politician, i.e., David Cameron, pledges to hold a “binding” referendum about Britain its membership to the EU its political suicide if you don’t follow through. Ironically enough, he killed his political career because he fought to remain in the EU and lost.

The next months will become even more interesting. The British government is now talking to move the deadline with one year. This would allow them to still cut a deal with the EU. As if 2 years and 9 months weren’t enough.

These were my memorable articles of the past week.

Do you have anything that you want to share? Leave a comment with a link or a summary and why you find it interesting.

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